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PLC and Printer
PLCs and related questions. topic
Posted by Mike on 9 June, 2002 - 8:21 pm
I'm looking to conect a printer to a SLC 504 what are my options do i need a basic card or can I conect to the com port.

Mike


Posted by kalpak dabir on 10 June, 2002 - 2:43 pm
did it with basic card for an earlier SLC. most convienent for formatting the printout and adding
titles, headings and msgs.

polsysdev@vsnl.net


Posted by Anonymous on 11 June, 2002 - 9:10 am
I've done it with the com port. We added the printer after the system was running. The problem with this is that the com port is customized and can not be used for programming anymore. Its relatively easy once you know the protocol.


Posted by Alan on 11 June, 2002 - 9:40 am
I managed to use a serial "till roll" printer with com port on a 5/03. Had to run coms fairly slow but managed to print text and values from data tables in PLC. Can not remember exactly how I did it but could dig PLC software out if it would help.

Contact me off list alan@tech24.co.uk


Posted by Bob Peterson on 11 June, 2002 - 1:41 pm
I guess it depends on a lot of factors - such as:

- What you are trying to print
- how fancy it has to be
- do you use the SLC serial port as a programming port

The BASIC module does a lot of the print formatting for you that you would have to yourself with the serial port. The BASIC module costs about $700, something approximating the cost of a days work. You could easily end up
spending that much extra time using the serial port instead of the BASIC module if your printout needs any kind of formatting.

OTOH-if your printout is relatively simple or you will be doing this regularly maybe its better to try this approach. And some people have a difficult time understanding how data gets across the backplane from the PLC to the BASIC module. I have never found it that difficult but if you have never used M1 and M0 files before you will need to read the manual first. You may want to buy the PBASE software if you decide to go the BASIC module route, although for simple programs you can get by with a terminal emulator. I have done it both ways.

I suggest you do NOT try this approach if the people maintaining the equipment do not have some kind of DH+ access for programming and debugging.

Bob Peterson


Posted by Jerry Miille on 14 June, 2002 - 2:57 pm
If you need to use the serial port for programming, another option would be to use a MARC Omnii-Comm "http://www.miille.com/PCds.htm":http://www.miille.com/PCds. htm and set up the ports for ASCII, and DF-1 to take care of the printer interface. A third port would be set up as a "pass thru" port which is essentially a copy of the serial port on the processor (Channel 0) and you would connect to it for programming. Mr. Petersons comments regarding formatting are right on target. I would only recommend this approach in you do not need to do anything fancy on the printer.

Jerry Miille


Posted by Anonymous on 11 June, 2002 - 4:56 pm
depends on the printer, i've hook up a printer to a slc 504 but the printer took in ancii commands through a serial port


Posted by Brian E Boothe on 17 June, 2002 - 12:45 pm
just hook your printer thru the PC and Pull values from you'r PLC thru VBA or VB and print on the printer thats very simple.. why u making this so complicated.????


Posted by Joe Jansen/ENGR/HQ/KEMET/US on 17 June, 2002 - 3:55 pm
Or, if you have a serial printer, you can skip the PC completely. Why complicate the system with VB on a PC?

SLC 5/04 supports ascii character manipulation. If you set the serial port to user mode, and use the string functions (see the SLC Instruction help
for info) you can send data straight out to the printer. Things like CR/LF and static formatting strings can be programmed into a ST register, and
sent out through the serail port very easily.

I did this using a serial bar code label printer, and was able to generate fairly complex pallet tags with multiple barcodes and text including time and date stamping in text and barcode this way. No need to junk up your system with a PC.

--Joe Jansen





Brian E Boothe <bboothe@MIDLANDS.NET>@ALIST.CONTROL.COM> on 06/15/2002 02:
18:18 PM

Please respond to automation@CONTROL.COM

Sent by: "The Automation mailing list, managed by Control.com Inc."
<AUTOMATION@ALIST.CONTROL.COM>


To: AUTOMATION@ALIST.CONTROL.COM
cc: (bcc: Joe Jansen/ENGR/HQ/KEMET/US)
Subject: Re: PLCs: PLC and Printer


just hook your printer thru the PC and Pull values from you'r PLC thru VBA
or VB and print on the printer
thats very simple.. why u making this so complicated.????



----- Original Message -----
From: "List Manager" <listm@CONTROL.COM>
To: <AUTOMATION@mind.CONTROL.COM>
Sent: Tuesday, June 11, 2002 9:07 AM
Subject: PLCs: PLC and Printer


> -------- Forwarded Message --------
> From: Mike <trombley@troybelting.com>
> To: AUTOMATION@CONTROL.COM
> Subject: PLCs: PLC and Printer
>
> What are some ways to interface a printer with a Allen Bradly SLC 504.
> I'm looking to conect a printer to a SLC 504 what are my options do i
> need a basic card or can I conect to the com port.
>
> Mike
>
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Posted by Dan McGrath on 11 July, 2002 - 1:52 pm
You should look at Muxiport from Tomantron. This multi-port device has unique ASCII mode functionality where the SLC5 can send out strings while preserving a programming port (DF1). The ASCII mode function will automatically trigger and send a variable length message depending on the value you write into a pointer register you define. This is explained on the tomantron website.

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