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turbine cost
The Business of Automation and Control topic
Posted by jkh on 4 October, 2010 - 8:17 am
How to consider turbine or compressor costs??

I heard in market turbine cost is as output power,meaning 1 MW= $1 MILLION

Is above correct or otherwise how is cost for turbine frame 9 GE in market ( GE's NEW)

How about compressors???

I will appreciate best reply.


Posted by CSA on 4 October, 2010 - 8:30 pm
The cost of any power-generating equipment (prime mover and generator) is usually expressed in terms of the output power. And a GE Frame 9E is a prime mover which would have to drive a generator to produce electrical power.

So, for an electrical power-producing turbine and generator the cost would be expressed in [denomination]/KW, or [denomination]/MW. It's one way, sometimes good, sometimes bad, to compare different types of power-producing equipment. For example, if you want to use dollars it would be expressed as dollars/MW, or if you used Euros it would be Euros/MW.

Since the axial compressor is part of a combustion (gas) turbine that produces torque the generator connected to the turbine converts into electrical power, the axial compressor's cost is included in the cost of the turbine and generator, since one is no good without the other. In other words, if you buy a generator but don't buy a turbine, you won't be able to easily make electrical power. Or, if you buy a gas turbine (which requires and includes an axial compressor

I hope this answers the question, since you talked about turbines, a gas turbine, compressors (it was presumed you were talking about axial compressors) and kind of ignored generators.

At any rate, cost/MW would generally be for the prime mover and electrical generator, and should include auxiliaries necessary to operate the turbine and generator.

If you were buying a prime mover and mechanical compressor (such as for a gas compressor), the cost could be expressed in terms of the work (horsepower, joules, etc.), so dollars/HP, for example, and it should still include the cost of auxiliaries necessary to operate the turbine and compressor.


Posted by jkh on 5 October, 2010 - 2:20 pm
how much is cost for ea. MW??


Posted by CSA on 5 October, 2010 - 6:51 pm
The numbers you cited are likely for the cost of purchasing the equipment to produce electrical power (that's a guess on my part, actually, since you haven't told us where you obtained the values). It may or may not include the cost of engineering (designing) the plant, acquiring the land, constructing the plant and all of its auxiliaries, etc.

Producing MW involves operation costs, including fuel costs, spare parts, maintenance costs, personnel costs, etc.

The numbers cited above are likely numbers that people typically use for a very "coarse" comparison of the costs of purchasing equipment for an electrical power plant. In other words, the prime mover and generator. It might be a steam turbine and generator, or a gas turbine and generator.

Are you talking about purchasing capital equipment to produce electrical power or producing electrical power with that equipment?

The cost of building and operating an electrical power plant to produce MW includes EVERYTHING, and usually is only known to very high managers and accountants in the companies that build and operate such power plants. The "total cost" of building and operating a power plant can be estimated, and usually is when considering whether or not to build a power plant.

But, your question is not clear. For a "true cost" to produce a MW for a power plant, one would need to know a LOT of things, and make a lot of assumptions (like how long the plant will be producing power; the future cost of fuel(s); the future cost of maintenance and personnel; etc.). I think the number you cited was just a cost "per MW" for purchasing the equipment, not for building the entire plant and operating it for a period of time.

The total amount of variables is pretty staggering to determine exactly how much each MW costs. And, it has to include some estimate of "forced outage" and breakage and lost production, too. It has to take into account the fuel efficiency of the equipment, and many, many other factors.

That's all I can add to this discussion.


Posted by Bob Johnston on 5 October, 2010 - 7:45 pm
From this years Gas Turbine World Handbook

GE PG9171E (126.1 Mw) = $US245/kW
GE PG9351FA (256.15 Mw) = $US212/kW


Posted by CSA on 6 October, 2010 - 10:57 am
Thanks, Bob!

Is this purchase price, or installed cost? Or anticipated operating cost over some anticipated life expectancy?



Posted by Bob Johnston on 7 October, 2010 - 12:22 am
Price is equipment only, budget price, FOB factory, single unit purchase


Posted by jkh on 7 October, 2010 - 3:49 pm
what means PG9351?
9 is frame and 1 is belong to shaft but don't know other

kindly advise



Posted by Bob Johnston on 7 October, 2010 - 9:25 pm
Middle two numbers are HP in thousands


Posted by otised on 7 October, 2010 - 9:37 pm
The 2nd and 3rd digits, followed by an appropriate number of zeros give the approximate rated shaft horsepower at ISO conditions. In this case, 350,000 HP (260 MW). Note, this is GT shaft output power, not generator terminal output power.


Posted by suhail on 8 October, 2010 - 6:28 am
IF i speak about GE model MS9001 E. here 9 is frame 9 what about the other three digits...


Posted by jkh on 10 October, 2010 - 4:12 pm
please advise


Posted by CSA on 11 October, 2010 - 12:47 pm
suhail,

I believe the two zeroes in the middles of 9001 are kind of like placeholders. The 9 signifies a Frame 9 (could be a 9E or a 9Fx, the E signifies an E-class unit). The 1 signifies a single-shaft unit (as opposed to a two-shaft machine).

MS9001E is a generic way of referring to a single-shaft, Frame 9E, GE-design, heavy duty gas turbine. If the zeroes were replaced with specific numerals (such as 17) that would be the more specific reference to the shaft output horsepower of the Frame 9E.

There have been several Frame 9Es produced over the years, with varying power outputs (generally, the outputs increased over the years as technology and materials improved). But Frame 9Es generally have the same number of combustors, and approximately the same physical size regardless of the differences in power output.

Hope this helps, suhail.


Posted by Joon Kit on 26 March, 2011 - 1:49 am
>From this years Gas Turbine World
>Handbook
>GE PG9171E (126.1 Mw) = $US245/kW
>GE PG9351FA (256.15 Mw) = $US212/kW

Hi, as according to your handbook, is there any quoted price on GE's Frame 7H System? In particular MS7001H/PG7001H? I need this piece of info fairly urgent. Would really appreciate your input.

Also, could you explain to me what does the $/kW means? is that the selling price of electricity or purchase price paid for the turbine? And what is the 'kW' referring to? Rated output of the turbine?

Looking forward to your reply.
Thank you.


Posted by krush on 27 March, 2011 - 7:17 pm
The handbook is available here: http://www.gtwbooks.com/

It's worth every penny if you are trying to get budget pricing on units.


Posted by omid on 1 January, 2014 - 5:51 am
hi BOB thanks for your information. i want to ask how about the jet engine? is this formula approved for calculating jet engine price?

> Handbook

> GE PG9171E (126.1 Mw) = $US245/kW
> GE PG9351FA (256.15 Mw) = $US212/kW

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